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Storyteller Paul Goble to be discussed at History and Heritage Book Club meeting





FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: March 2, 2017
CONTACT: Jeff Mammenga, Media Coordinator, (605) 773-6000, jeff.mammenga@state.sd.us

Storyteller Paul Goble to be discussed at History and Heritage Book Club meeting

PIERRE, S.D. – The life and works of award-winning author and illustrator Paul Goble will be discussed at the March meeting of the History and Heritage Book Club.

Gregory Bryan will discuss his book “Paul Goble, Storyteller” when the book club meets at 7 p.m. CDT on Tuesday, March 14, at the Cultural Heritage Center in Pierre. The South Dakota Historical Society Press published the book in January.

“Goble wrote and illustrated more than 40 books, many of them for children. His books beautifully illustrated and retold legends of the Plains Indians,” said Michael Lewis, president of the South Dakota Historical Society Foundation. “Because Goble used his art to relate stories of the Lakota and other tribes, those legends will live on.”

The foundation is the nonprofit fundraising partner of the South Dakota State Historical Society. The foundation and the press are sponsoring the History and Heritage Book Club program, which is free and open to the public.

Goble was born in 1933 in England. He became interested in everything related to American Indians when he was a child. Goble studied at the Central School of Art in London. Starting in 1969, Goble used his art to relate legends of the Lakota and other tribes. He moved to the United States in 1977 and became a citizen in 1984. He made his home in the Black Hills until his death on Jan. 5.

Bryan is a professor of education at the University of Manitoba, specializing in literacy education and children’s literature. In “Paul Goble, Storyteller,” Bryan interviewed Goble, his family, friends and those whose work he influenced. The book is illustrated with Goble’s works and features stories about his creative process in writing, designing and illustrating his books. Goble’s book “The Girl Who Loved Wild Horses” received the 1979 Caldecott Medal, which annually honors the illustrator of the most distinguished American book for children.

Bryan will speak at the meeting via telephone. A PowerPoint that he created about Goble will be shown while he speaks. If people want to listen to Bryan’s talk via telephone, they may make arrangements to do so by calling (605) 773-6006.

“Paul Goble, Storyteller” is available at the Heritage Stores at the Cultural Heritage Center and the Capitol. Copies of some of Goble’s other books, including “The Girl Who Loved Wild Horses,” are available for sale at the Heritage Store at the Cultural Heritage Center.

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About the South Dakota State Historical Society
The South Dakota State Historical Society is a division of the Department of Education. The State Historical Society, an Affiliate of the Smithsonian Institution, is headquartered at the South Dakota Cultural Heritage Center in Pierre. The center houses the society’s world-class museum, the archives, and the historic preservation, publishing and administrative/development offices. Call (605) 773-3458 or visit www.history.sd.gov for more information. The society also has an archaeology office in Rapid City; call (605) 394-1936 for more information.

About the South Dakota Historical Society Foundation
The South Dakota Historical Society Foundation is a private charitable nonprofit that seeks funding to assist the South Dakota State Historical Society in programming and projects to preserve South Dakota’s history and heritage for future generations.